VENICE IS KNOW AS THE SHARK TOOTH CAPITAL

    All along the coast of Venice from Nokomis Beach south to Manasota Key, an inexhaustible supply of sharks’ teeth lies just beneath the sand. Those teeth are why Venice bills itself as “The Shark Tooth Capital of the World” and celebrates that designation with an annual Sharks’ Tooth Festival each April. If you want to hunt the precious little gems and other fossils and need a few pointers. Fossilguy.com and mustdo.com offer up the best times to search along with the best spots. Below are a few lucky spots according to Fossilguy.com.

    VENICE FISHING PIER

    The Venice Fishing Pier is at 1600 Harbor Dr. S., Venice, FL. It’s at Sharky’s Restaurant. The beach around the pier still has fossils from the offshore formation washing up. You will notice the sand has many black granules in it. This is phosphate grains from the formation, shark teeth are found where you see these little black grains. Good spots to sift are in the surf, where the waves break just in the water, and between the beach and the first sandbar, usually knee to waist deep in water. MOST of the shark teeth are small (less than an inch in size), so look carefully!

    CASPERSEN BEACH

    Slightly further south at the end of Harbor Dr, Englewood, Venice, FL is Caspersen beach. This is a scenic park with a beach facility, scenic nature trails, picnic areas, and, of course, a beach. The beach is more rocky, so fewer swimmers and sunbathers go here, but the fossils like to hide around the rocks. This is an excellent spot to fossil shark tooth hunt. Good spots to sift are in the surf, where the waves break just in the water, and between the beach and the first sandbar, usually knee to waist deep in water. MOST of the shark teeth are small (less than an inch in size), so look carefully! Just like at the Venice Fishing Pier, you will see tons of tiny black phosphate granules in the sand that come from the offshore formation. Sift away!

    MANASOTA BEACH

    This beach is a few miles south of Caspersen beach. It’s at the end of Manasota Beach Road. The address is 8570 Manasota Key Road, Manasota Key, FL. This scenic beach has a beach facility and a boardwalk to get to the beach. Just like the other beaches, fossils can be found washing in the surf, and in the tide line. One fun thing at this beach is the concrete walkway has fossil shark teeth embedded in it!
    Good spots to sift are in the surf, where the waves break just in the water, and between the beach and the first sandbar, usually knee to waist deep in water. MOST of the shark teeth are small (less than an inch in size), so look carefully!

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